Your Hue

Your Hue is an initiative of HUE, LLC, a progressive social entrepreneurship specializing in socio-economic development throught the African diaspora. Come and share Your Hue with us.

dignityinschools:

Coleman Advocates in the Bay Area released this photo series as part of the Week of Action

dignityinschools:

An excerpt from Growing Fairness, a documentary by Teachers Unite on Restorative Justice

On an average our state spends more money ($88,000) imprisoning and criminalizing our youth and 50% less for their education. We are now living in a world where education is no longer the greatest achievement instead it’s a new booking process designed to push out students from schools to prison. My name is Joevonte Kelly I am a DSC, B.O.P. youth leader in Oakland CA and I have a high tolerance to push for policies that provide young people with high quality education.

— - Joevonte Kelly, Black Organizing Project (B.O.P.)

(Source: dignityinschools)

We want #SolutionsNotSuspensions & #RestorativeJustice. Tell Congress to take action against #SchoolPushout http://thndr.it/17I4Y6Q

We want #SolutionsNotSuspensions & #RestorativeJustice. Tell Congress to take action against #SchoolPushout http://thndr.it/17I4Y6Q

Push Back Against School Pushout - DSC 2013 Week of Action

ethiopienne:

Marissa Alexander, domestic violence survivor, granted new trial


TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — A Florida appeals court is ordering a new trial for a woman sentenced to 20 years to prison after she fired a warning shot in a wall during a dispute with her husband.
The 1st District Court of Appeal ruled that a judge did not properly instruct the jury handling the case of Marissa Alexander.
But the appeals court did also state that the judge was right to block Alexander from using the state’s “Stand Your Ground” law as a way to defend her actions.
Alexander had never been arrested before she fired a bullet at a wall one day in 2010 to scare off her husband when she felt he was threatening her.
Her case in Jacksonville has drawn attention and criticism aimed at mandatory-minimum sentencing laws.
Associated Press

ethiopienne:

Marissa Alexander, domestic violence survivor, granted new trial

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — A Florida appeals court is ordering a new trial for a woman sentenced to 20 years to prison after she fired a warning shot in a wall during a dispute with her husband.

The 1st District Court of Appeal ruled that a judge did not properly instruct the jury handling the case of Marissa Alexander.

But the appeals court did also state that the judge was right to block Alexander from using the state’s “Stand Your Ground” law as a way to defend her actions.

Alexander had never been arrested before she fired a bullet at a wall one day in 2010 to scare off her husband when she felt he was threatening her.

Her case in Jacksonville has drawn attention and criticism aimed at mandatory-minimum sentencing laws.

Associated Press

(Source: ethiopienne)

Because femininity is so focused on women’s bodies, the value placed on various attributes of female bodies means that evaluations of femininity are fairly clearcut. Within standards of feminine beauty that correlate closely with race and age women are pretty or they are not. Historically, in the American context, young women with milky White skin, long blond hair, and slim figures were deemed to be the most beautiful and therefore the most feminine women. Within this interpretive context, skin color, body type, hair texture, and facial features become important dimensions of femininity. This reliance on these standards of beauty automatically render the majority of African American women at best as less beautiful, and at worst, ugly. Moreover, these standards of female beauty have no meaning without the visible presence of Black women and others who fail to measure up. Under these feminine norms, African American women can never be as beautiful as White women because they never become White.

—Patricia Hill Collins (via wretchedoftheearth)

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)